(Magyar) Megjelent a Napló és történelem c. szimpózium kilenc előadása

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Declaration on the proposed legislation concerning the status of the Central European University

The board of the International Association of Hungarian Studies believes that no national academic discipline can be cultivated in isolation. The Universitas Europae Centralis, founded after the fall of the Socialist Regime, has offered excellent opportunities for Hungarian researchers to locally learn about the latest world trends in human sciences as well as theoretical and methodological results that are also important to ensure progress in Hungarian Studies. The CEU has made a difference by making it possible for the representatives of various Central and Eastern European disciplines that were working once in isolation to engage in dialogue and recognize each other’s work. Since its foundation, the CEU has continuously improved education; its research programmes have been exemplary, and its library has played a significant role in correcting Hungary’s systemic deficiencies in our scientific infrastructure.

For centuries, intellectuals sharing traditional European values have been fighting for a free dialogue between research centers and the free flow of ideas and reflections on the differing canons. These achievements should not be threatened by ideological, political, and ultimately selfish economic interests and power struggles.

The scientific society must stand up to any attempt that threatens scientific thinking and free research. As part of its nature, science has always had a function to be critical, and this is indispensable for the future of science and the freedom of education.

This is why we would like to express our solidarity with our colleagues threatened by an ill-prepared proposal lacking a broad social consensus and to raise our voices against the attack on an institute, which is essential in supporting the cause of Hungarian Studies in a broader sense of the word.

Andrea Seidler
President

István Monok
Co-President

Sándor Bene
General Secretary

(Magyar) Interjú Peter Sherwooddal

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(Magyar) Tájékoztató a Nemzetközi Magyarságtudományi Társaság 2016. évi munkájáról

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(Magyar) 1% a magyarságtudományért

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(Magyar) Költözik az iroda – technikai információ

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(Magyar) Az MTA BTK Irodalomtudományi Intézetének új bibliográfiai portálja

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The Narrow Path to Freedom: István Bibó’s Public Moralism”

Szövegközi kép 1
University of Jyväskylä’s Hungarian Studies Program’s Spectrum Hungarologicum proudly presents the publication of the first Finnish monograph on István Bibó. “Vapauden kapea polku: István Bibón julkinen moralismi” / “The Narrow Path to Freedom: István Bibó’s Public Moralism” is written by the historian Anssi Halmesvirta and this is the 9th volume of Spectrum Hungarologicum.
The open-access publication can be downloaded in pdf-format from the link below:
Abstract: The task of this study is to listen to the moral voice of István Bibó, a Hungarian democrat. Listening to past ‘voices’ is an approach of intellectual history introduced by Stefan Collini, who has eavesdropped on the conversations of ‘public moralists’ in the British intellectual life from the period c. 1850–1950. What has been translated of and written on Bibó’s thought in Hungary – irrespective of a couple of notable exceptions not much is found abroad – is very ‘Hungarian’ in tone in particular, note the very productive workshop (Bibó Szellemi Műhely), whereas I have tried independently to develop Collini’s approach. Instead of uncovering the meanings of ideas and concepts in the contexts of their utterance (textuality and conceptual unity), Collini’s point is to study political ideas and arguments in relation to some basic values that an intellectual culture maintains and intellectuals reevaluate. My hypothesis is that Bibó’s voice is ‘publicly moralist’, as he sent serious messages to his reading public, not only to Hungarian intelligentsia but occasionally to all Europeans. Not entertaining so much a ‘scientific attitude’, in times of crisis Bibó detected
confusion, decay and loss of the fundamental values on which order and legitimacy of power in a society rest. His main message was to awaken the elites to their proper function of reinventing and resuscitating such values as equality, freedom, solidarity, temperance, moderation, political correctness, and social justice. He also pointed to their possible moral failings; they had not been ready or willing in their governing practice to execute timely reforms in accordance with such values. Bibó presupposed that moral issues outweigh political, economic or aesthetic considerations. His rhetoric was not only rational persuasion or political-cultural criticism telling the truth and demanding some social reform from a set political platform. Instead, he stood on a higher moral ground from which he could preach the revival of democratic values that were, in his view, at some critical historical moment brought to forebut lost (in Hungary e.g. in 1848–1849, 1945 and 1956). Bibó used his voice from a rearguard position and took part in political life only when a democratic solution appeared feasible (in 1945–1947 and 1956). Thus political theory for Bibó appears as a parasite to social values and moral comprehension.

(Magyar) Zrínyi-album – könyvbemutató 2016. december 1-jén

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(Magyar) MONOKgraphia

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